Seven Ate Nine

seven-ate-nine-400Illustrated by Zachary Trover

One was having a terrible day. She still couldn’t count to Nine, and the other numbers wouldn’t even let her try. But things took a turn for the worse when Seven ate Nine. He was doing a real number on everyone! Will she be the last One left?

NOW AVAILABLE as an interactive app/game for tablets/phones from TINY TAP (requires Tiny Tap app)                                                                                      Read by the author!

 

REVIEWS

Amazon review

When my nephew brought me this book and told me I would laugh, I was skeptical (after all, 4 year old humor and adult humor usually do not equate), but I began to read. Boy was I shocked. From the very first page I was smiling as One began to count (“Me, Two, Three…”). The smile only got bigger as I turned every page. The author, with a very unique view on the world of numbers, took something as simple as counting and made it into a hilarious tale. It was funny and entertaining and my nephew and I did laugh out loud. I especially liked how the author included comprehension questions at the end of the book (a true teacher at heart). Overall, a great, educational read.

Amazon review

I picked up this book based on the title alone. I thought it would be a book my husband (an engineer with a quirky sense of humor) would enjoy reading to our kids (6 and 3.5). What an absolutely fun read!! My 3.5 year enjoys the numbers, the story and the great illustrations. I was surprised that my […] kindergartner actually understood the double meanings in the story (there’s more than ate/eight). We were all laughing as we read the book. I could see older kids enjoying this book quite a bit too. It’s a clever story that makes you laugh and has plenty of depth to the story to sink your minds in to.

Amazon review

789 is a good story for kids who have learned or are learning their numbers, and it is filled with puns that will charm adults and children. The story is about understanding and being one’s self, but it is not preachy and saccharine. The message is presented with warmth and humor, and can be fruitfully read a number of times.

Milo & the Monster

milo-and-the-monster-400Illustrated by Jeff Ebbeler

To avoid Sharing Time, Milo hides in a book—actually inside it! He decides to fill the pages with the story of his life. But before he can begin, he finds a monster who’d prefer a story about eating boys! Can Milo outwit the monster and get back to safety before THE END?

NOW AVAILABLE as an interactive app/game for tablets/phones from TINY TAP (requires Tiny Tap app) Read by the author!

 

REVIEWS

 

The Sharpest Tool in the Shed

the-sharpest-tool-in-the-shed-400Illustrated by Brandon Reibeling

Being the youngest tool isn’t easy. No one listens to Nick, and everyone says he’s dull. But when a fire erupts on the farm, only the brave little saw springs into action. Soon they’ll be calling Nick a hero — and the sharpest tool in the shed!

NOW AVAILABLE as an interactive app/game for tablets/phones from TINY TAP (requires Tiny Tap app)                                                                                      Read by the author!

 

REVIEWS

Amazon review

Nick the saw has a hard time impressing his fellow tools until he shows them how to be a hero. The story’s great fun and the wordplay will be enjoyable for kids (and the adults who will read it to kids). The other tools are named after celebrities (such as Mini Screwdriver), exemplifying the wit and humor of the book. This story will have kids fixin’ to smile.

Amazon review

The word play in this book is delightful. A hammer named Mike, a pick named Tracey, and a hoe, named Don are just some of the tools in this book. In addition to the fun names, there are fun puns as well. But there is also a more serious side to the book. Mr. Slater is a teacher and has produced a book that will help children to discuss feelings of not being accepted by their peers. It would be an excellent book for elementary school children as a conversation starter on this very important topic.

Amazon review

This book is a surefire winner for parents who read to their children for both entertainment and instruction. It is filled with delightful puns and word play for sharpening little minds or just enjoying the whimsy of English.

 

On the Level

on-the-level-400Illustrated by Andrés Martínez Ricci

The tools are all counting on Nevil the Level to win this year’s soapbox derby. Nevil thinks the only way he can win is by cheating, and Mini-screwdriver tells him how. As the pressure mounts, what will happen to Nevil’s motto, “Straight and True”?

NOW AVAILABLE as an interactive app/game for tablets/phones from TINY TAP (requires Tiny Tap app) Read by the author!

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Andi’s Kids Books

On the Level is one of the books by David Michael Slater that features favorite tool characters, such as Nevil Level, Mini Screwdriver, Don Hoe, Henry Sprinkler, and more.

In this book, Nevil Level is preparing for a soapbox race, keeping his car “straight and true.” The tools have never won a race before, and Nevil’s poor performance makes it seem that they never will. The other tools are mean and stomp off in a huff, complaining about Nevil. Only Mini Screwdriver has faith in Nevil’s level abilities.

Mini gives Nevil the gift of a black box, in which she says there is a powerful magnet that will draw him to the finish line where the other tools will be waiting.

Throughout the race, any time that Nevil thinks he is failing, he thinks of that powerful magnet in the black box in his car and is able to keep on moving forward. When he wins by a landslide, the Hammer Slammer and the Driller Thriller accuse him of cheating.

In the next race, Nevil again focuses on his powerful magnet drawing him to the finish line as he races the Flame Thrower. Again, he is accused of not being on the level with his racing ability. He decides to confess, and pulls out the black box, only to find that it looks empty. He realizes that he won because he was being carried by the faith of a friend. And he inspires the other tools to carry their “empty extra parts” filled with faith to lead them through their races.

It’s an inspirational story that reminds children that if they believe in themselves, they can accomplish anything. It also tells them to show their faith in their friends to help their friends accomplish their goals, as well.

Characters in the book, though they are tools, can appeal to girls as well as boys. The puns on their names make for great groaners that can keep parents and teachers entertained as they read the book out loud. The idioms contained within are defined at the end of the book and lead to great lessons on the English language.

Illustrations by Andres Martinez Ricci will also appeal to children, as their style mimics kids’ favorite cartoons on Cartoon Network, brightly colored and cartoony expressions.

 

A Wrench in the Works

a-wrench-in-the-works-400Illustrated by Andrés Martínez Ricci

Nick the Saw is famous for saving the children from a fire. It’s Nick, Nick, Nick all the time. Handy the Wrench is sick of Nick. When the tools plan a parade for their hero, Handy decides to fix Nick’s wagon once and for all. But he goes too far. Soon, nothing works and the farmer wants new tools. Can Handy set things right before it’s too late?

NOW AVAILABLE as an interactive app/game for tablets/phones from TINY TAP (requires Tiny Tap app) Read by the author!

REVIEWS